Every day a different body. Every day a different life. Every day in love with the same girl.

There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.

It’s all fine until the morning that A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. From that moment, the rules by which A has been living no longer apply. Because finally A has found someone he wants to be with—day in, day out, day after day.

MY THOUGHTS

I don’t even know if I have the right words to express how much I love this book. I’m actually going to give it 7 stars. I have a lot of 5 stars so I need to separate the great from the AMAZING.

If I had to describe this book in one word, I’d say: Layers. There are layers upon layers of themes and concepts that leave you thinking about life in this broader more philosophical sense and I know that it makes it sound educational or possibly booooring. Trust me. It’s such a page turner. There’s a sense of urgency ticking throughout the entire book because A is going to have an entirely different face tomorrow.

Many YA authors have tackled sexual orientation and diversity really well in recent years (including this author with previous novels) but in Every Day, Levithan takes it five steps further and simply strips his characters down until they have nothing left but their soul and then asks the question, how far will love stretch? How much of our physical being is tied to love? When A falls in love with Rhiannon, A’s in the body of a boy, but as A shifts everyday to a new identity, that love doesn’t change. Whether a geeky boy or a hot African American girl, A’s soul and spirit is connected to Rhiannon in a way that sees through any outer shell…but to get her to love A while the faces change every day…

Our society has come a long way with acceptance regarding sexual orientation but still, I think we want to put people in those molds, we just have a few more shapes…boy who likes boys. Girl who likes boys and girls…ect…Somehow, Levithan has managed to move us past the labels and the molds and allowed us to see straight into the hearts of his characters and explore humanity without being distracted by outer shells.

Even though I made the book sound controversial in this review and that it almost sounds like it’s about making a big statement, it just isn’t. Seriously. That’s what I came away with after reading but in general, it’s fairly clean and appropriate for even younger readers.

Similar To: Honestly, I don’t know of anything like this book

BUY EVERY DAY

2018-02-19T13:57:45+00:00

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